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Education: Appendices

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Appendix 01: From Sudan to the United States — the saga of one “Lost Boy”
Monday, January 01, 1900
"Like many people in the Dinka tribe, when I was younger we depended on dairy cattle for our living. We Dinkas also cultivated crops. I lived a happy life in the countryside with my father, mother, grandfather and uncles, but when war broke out, our lives changed completely.
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Appendix 02: Aceh, Indonesia — young lives in conflict
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Thirteen-year-old Sri has fond memories of her home village in North Aceh in Indonesia. Though she has lived in a camp for the internally displaced in the neighboring region of North Sumatra for three years, such a long time for someone so young, she still misses her old friends. "I had many friends back home, and very nice teachers," she remembers.
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Appendix 03: A Young Woman’s Story
Monday, January 01, 1900
On March 20, 2002 five soldiers came to my house in Burma looking for my husband. Without any explanation, they handcuffed him while others searched the house. I shouted to my husband but was told not to make any noise. A soldier pushed me down and hit me with the butt of his gun. Then he handcuffed me and put me in the car. I was taken to a military camp. I did not see my husband alive again.
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Appendix 04: Fears of Mutilation and Death
Monday, January 01, 1900
Rodi was 16 when she married Francisco in Guatemala. Her husband brutally beat her and vowed to kill her. "Francisco raped and sodomized Rodi, broke windows and mirrors with her head, dislocated her jaw, and tried to abort her child by kicking her violently in the spine. Besides using his hands and his feet against her, he also resorted to weapons —pistol-whipping her and terrorizing her with his machete."
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Appendix 05: The Catholic View
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
"The fact that the Church carries out extensive relief efforts on behalf of refugees, especially in recent years, should not be a source of surprise to anyone. Indeed this is an integral part of the Church's mission in the world. The Church is ever mindful that Jesus Christ himself was a refugee, that as a child he had to flee with his parents from his native land in order to escape persecution. In every age therefore the Church feels herself called to help refugees. And she will continue to d? so, to the full extent that her limited means allow." ~ Pope John Paul II, Address to Refugees in Exile at Morong, no. 3.
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Appendix 06: The New Colossus
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
"Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
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Appendix 07: My Life Journey as a Refugee
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
As a Somali refugee, Abdul Sheikh is able to reflect on a childhood full of tragedy and life-threatening experiences. Having found asylum within the United States, Abdul feels it is important to share his life experiences with others:
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Appendix 08: What is Jesuit Refugee Service?
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Jesuit Refugee Service is an international humanitarian organization with a mission is to accompany, serve and advocate for the rights of refugees and forcibly displaced people. JRS provides assistance to refugees in refugee camps and in cities, to people displaced within their own country, to asylum seekers in cities and to migrants held in detention centers.
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Appendix 09: Sri Lanka – Victims of Natural Disaster and Civil Strife
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
While the 2004 tsunami drew the eyes of the world to Sri Lanka as well as other nations bordering the Indian Ocean, three years later other events have claimed our attention. The tragedy of Sri Lanka, however, transcends the tsunami, causing JRS presence as part of its mission to serve, accompany and defend the rights of refugees and forcibly displaced people.
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Appendix 10 — Limitations on International Obligations to Refugees
Monday, January 01, 1900
The obligations of states toward refugees are generally set out in the 1951 Convention and Protocol. Other forms of "complementary protection" are provided by other sources of international law, such as the human rights treaty and the more recent treaty protecting torture victims.
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