Jesuit Refugee Service/USA: FY24 Minibus Fails to Meet the Needs of Refugees

15 June 2024

This is not the time to chip away at programs that provide lifesaving assistance to refugees and other forcibly displaced persons,
Joan Rosenhauer, President of Jesuit Refugee Service/USA

Ahead of the March 22 deadline, Speaker Mike Johnson released text for the second FY24 funding bill, “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act 2024,” to conclude the FY24 budget process. The bill includes funding for U.S. government programs that provide lifesaving assistance to refugees here in the U.S. and abroad. As Congress will move quickly to pass this bill to avert a government shutdown, Jesuit Refugee Service/USA (JRS/USA) expresses deep disappointment over major cuts to critical refugee programs.  

“This is not the time to chip away at programs that provide lifesaving assistance to refugees and other forcibly displaced persons,” said Joan Rosenhauer, President of Jesuit Refugee Service/USA. “With over 110 million people displaced worldwide, the U.S. must continue to invest in programs, such as education and psychosocial support initiatives, that respond to the needs of displaced persons internationally and those seeking safety at our borders. These critical programs help build a hopeful and peaceful future for refugees and for all of us.”  

The spending bill reduces funds in the Migration and Refugee Assistance program from $4.447 billion in FY23 to $3.928 billion in FY24, and cuts funding to the International Basic Education program, dropping from $970 million in FY23 to $922 million in FY24. The Education Cannot Wait account, which supports education programs in conflict and crisis settings, increases slightly from $30 million in FY23 to $30.4 in FY24.  

As funding cuts will reduce the reach of these programs, we remind Congress that the U.S. must continue to be a world leader in supporting refugees globally through robust funding for critical services.
Giulia McPherson, Vice President of Advocacy

Refugee education initiatives provide a pathway for displaced youth to achieve their goals and improve overall well-being during a distressing time in their life,” said Giulia McPherson, Vice President of Advocacy. “As funding cuts will reduce the reach of these programs, we remind Congress that the U.S. must continue to be a world leader in supporting refugees globally through robust funding for critical services.”